Evening Grosbeaks

Male Evening Grosbeak

Male Evening Grosbeak

About two weeks ago we made a trip to Telegraph to stay with my Grandma. It was a short trip; only three days but it was wonderful to see Grandma and my auntie again! I was lucky on this trip because I finally was able to see the lifer I had been searching for during our past visits to Telegraph: the Evening Grosbeak. A few came and visited my Grandma’s feeder, and then the neighbours invited me over to view them at their feeders. The number of birds that they get is mind-boggling. Last year I visited them and counted more than 100 Black-capped Chickadees visiting the feeders at one time. Though I may have been double-counting some individuals, there was definitely at least 100. I had never seen that many chickadees in one place at one time before. Truly amazing! When I came this time they had about fifty Evening Grosbeaks singing from the tops of the trees and scrapping with each other at the feeders. I now understand what people mean when they say the song of an Evening Grosbeak is not pretty… it is a very harsh, ringing sound. Nothing like Pine Grosbeaks who sing a sweet warble. Harsh song aside, Evening Grosbeaks are very flashy and bright. The females are different shades of grey with light yellows blending in, while the males are bold black and yellow. Both sexes have bright white wing patches. Beautiful birds, and I was lucky enough to get fantastic close-range views of them for long periods of time.

Evening Grosbeak

Evening Grosbeak

Male Evening Grosbeak

Male Evening Grosbeak

Mountain Chickadees were another new bird for me in Telegraph, though they are not lifers. I had never seen a single one there before and this time I saw 3 individuals.

Mountain Chickadee

Mountain Chickadee

Another highlight was the flock of super tame Common and Hoary Redpolls hanging out at Grandma’s feeder. The flock numbered at about 15, and would perch and eat out of my hand without hesitation. When I crouched down they would crawl around and over my feet, jump into my seed-filled hands, and fly up to land on my head.

Male Common Redpoll Eating Out of My Hand

Male Common Redpoll Eating Out of My Hand

This trip to Telegraph was very productive in concern to new and cool birds for me 🙂

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